Teaching

EMA 700: Theory of Elasticity (Fall 2018)

Graduate Level, 3 Credits

Course description.

The following general topic areas will be covered in this course: Vectors, tensors, kinematics, forces and stresses, constitutive equations, material symmetry, linearized elasticity problems, 2D problems (plane stress problems, plane strain problems, Airy’s stress function), 3D problems (field theory results, potentials in elasticity, composites), torsion of noncircular cylinders, variational methods, and nonlinear elasticity.

Course learning outcomes. 

By the end of this class, students will be able to:

  • Work with tensor and indicial notations to solve engineering problems
  • Describe the fundamental principles and equations governing deformations and stresses in materials exhibiting elastic response
  • Describe the assumptions and approximations inherent in the linearized theory of elasticity
  • Use various rigorous solution methods to solve 2D and 3D elasticity problems
  • Describe the effects of material anisotropy to the governing equations and solutions of a variety of elasticity problems

Prerequisites.

Graduate or Professional standing,

EMA 506: Advanced Mechanics of Materials, Math 321: Applied Mathematical Analysis or equivalent or consent of instructor.

Course material.

Available in canvas course website.

EMA 615: Micro and Nanoscale Mechanics (Fall 2019)

Undergraduate and Graduate Level, 3 Credits

Course description.

An introduction to micro- and nanoscale science and engineering with a focus on the role of mechanics. A variety of micro- and nanoscale phenomena and applications covered, drawing connections to both established and new mechanics approaches.

Course learning outcomes. 

By the end of this class, you will be able to:

  • Describe the current state and potential future impact of micro and nanotechnology.
  • Describe the role that mechanics plays in micro- and nanoscale science and engineering.
  • Identify and quantitatively investigate the dominant effects of surfaces, interfaces, defects, and material property variations in the micro and nanoscales.
  • Describe and use the cross-disciplinary integration among the fields of mechanics, materials science, physics, and chemistry at the micro and nanoscales.

Prerequisites.

Mechanics of Materials: EMA 303 or ME 306, or graduate or professional standing, or consent of instructor.

Course material.

Available in canvas course website.

EMA 405: Practicum in Finite Elements (Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Spring 2019, Spring 2020)

Undergraduate Level, 3 Credits

Course description.

The goal of this Engineering Mechanics and Astronautics (EMA) course is to introduce the methods of solving various engineering problems in commercial finite elements (FE) software. This course will use the FE software ANSYS, but the methods and workflow taught will be applicable to any FE software. Major emphasis of this course is on the behavior of FE, modeling, and evaluation of results for correctness. There will be relatively little time devoted to the theoretical underpinnings of finite elements, which can be learnt through taking courses such as EMA 605 (Introduction to Finite Elements) and EMA 705 (Advanced Topics in Finite Elements). A broad range of analysis types, including static structural, modal, harmonic, transient, random vibrations, nonlinear material (plasticity), nonlinear contact, buckling, and thermal analyses are discussed. Students are expected to become familiar in working with various types of elements such as truss, beam, planer, shell, and solid elements, pre-processing to setup the problem, meshing 2D and 3D elements, and post-processing and reporting the results in a technical report.

Course learning outcomes. 

By the end of this class, students will be able to:

  • Identify the nature of an engineering problem and devise a simplified model that addresses the problem
  • Use preliminary analysis to inform the finite element model
  • Set up the model by using various element types, meshing in 2D and 3D, and by applying required boundary conditions to solve an engineering problem
  • Perform various types of finite element analyses such as static structural, thermal, modal, harmonic, transient, random vibration, nonlinear materials, nonlinear contact, and buckling analyses
  • Post-process the numerical results to describe and present the solutions
  • Qualitatively and quantitatively verify the results using visual observations, a variety of back of the envelop calculations, preliminary analysis, tabulated results, and numerical techniques
  • Use a commercial finite element software (ANSYS) with a certain level of proficiency
  • Prepare and present informative reports on their finite element modeling work

Prerequisites.

EMA 201 (Statics), EMA 202 (Dynamics), EMA 303 (Mechanics of Materials), and knowledge of elementary matrix algebra, or graduate standing.

Course material.

Available in canvas course website.